Lighting Ancestral Lamps

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CHAPTER VI

AN INTERLUDE: INTERESTS OF COLONIAL
AND U.S.A. ANCESTORS INTERLOCKED

For five rugged pioneering generations covering one hundred twenty-five years of colonial history and a like period from the Declaration of Independence down to the twentieth century, the family bearing the surname Bunn, were a pioneering people. The male ancestors, along with the numerous maternal ancestors who married into the Bunn family over this relatively long formative period of America, have carved an admirable name for posterity to review and ponder over.

As an avocation Charles N. French, Chicago lawyer and Bunn family researcher for the greater part of his life, tried to unravel the history of the English Bunns from the time the first ancestors landed in America and through generation after generation until he could link them into a complete chain. He succeeded.

The work of French indicates that the current descendants of this early American family can well be proud of their ancestors. They are not in the least unusual, but rather an ordinary, dependable, trustworthy, pioneering kind of people - typical of those early families that made
America the kind of nation it is today.

Certainly the acts and services of the pioneers cannot justly be measured without considering their educational, social, and political situations, as well as their facilities for moral business or political development. These early people had varying habits, tastes, and activities. Their mental and physical characteristics were different. Their struggles with each other varied. Their reverses and successes in their value among their fellow men.

These early people progressed in spite of their social, industrial, and educational disadvantages. Many of them were earnest, enthusiastic, brimming over with life, full of energy, and confidence.

They were supposed to have largely come to America where they could worship as they pleased. Once over here, however the economic motive seemed frequently to have outdistanced the religious motive. They had to make a living for themselves or give up in disgrace. Thus the early pioneer soon spread

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Cover | Contents | Forward | Intro | Orgins | England | Crest | First | Interlude | Benjamin 1

Benjamin | Hyatts | Hyatt1 | Hazard | Perry | William | HM Bunn | Index